When you need a fast and reliable hosting solution, you should consider which web server and database system to use. Many sites find the combination of nginx (pronounced "engine x") and MariaDB to be an optimal solution. Let's see how to install and configure the applications to work together.

This blog post will show how to Install MaxScale and MariaDB 5.5 Galera Cluster with Severalnines Cluster Control on Amazon Virtual Private Cloud.

The steps in this blog:

  1. How to setup Amazon Virtual Private Cloud
  2. How to prepare the MariaDB Galera Cluster nodes and to set the subnet routings
  3. How to install MariaDB Galera 3 node cluster in the private subnet of an AWS VPC using Severalnines Cluster Control
  4. How to build MaxScale from git source on the Cluster Control node

MaxScale, an open-source database-centric router for MySQL and MariaDB makes High Availability possible by hiding the complexity of backends and masking failures. MaxScale itself however is a single application running in a Linux box between the client application and the databases - so how do we make MaxScale High Available? This blog post shows how to quickly setup a Pacemaker/Corosync environment and configure MaxScale as a managed cluster resource. We will guide you step by step on how to enable basic High Availability by setting up three Linux Centos 6.5 servers with MaxScale.

graphWith MariaDB, as with any service, you must monitor user resource usage to ensure optimal performance. MariaDB provides detailed statistics for resource usage on per-user basis that you can use for database service monitoring and optimization. User statistics are especially useful in shared environments to prevent a single gluttonous user from causing server-wide performance deterioration. If you detect abnormal use, you can apply fine-grained limits, as we'll see.

Tags: 

MaxScale for MariaDB and MySQL hides the complexity of database scaling from the application. To streamline building MaxScale from source and running the test suite, you can automate the process with some useful tools to meet your needs. I have created a Vagrant / Puppet setup I'd like to share with you.

Enabling GTIDs for server replication in MariaDB 10.0

Replication has been one of the most popular MySQL features since it made its way into the application more than a decade ago. Global Transaction IDs was introduced to make handling complex solutions easier. This blog explains how MariaDB makes handling GTID simpler

MaxScale 1.0 from SkySQL is now in Beta and there are some cool features in it, I guess some adventurous people has already put it into production. There are still some rough edges and stuff to be fixed, but it is clearly close to GA. One thing missing though are something to manage starting and stopping MaxScale in a somewhat controlled way, which is what this blog is all about.

Here we take a look at how one of the example filters supplied with the MaxScale 1.0 beta can answer that simplest of profiling questions - "Which of my database queries run within the MySQL server for the longest time?".

We all know that in general it's a bad idea to have columns values contain too much "hidden" information, and in particular for primary keys, this is a big no-no, although I know that not everybody agrees here. In some cases though, there is data that at it's heart contains several aspects and we just cannot avoid this, the prime example being data and time values. What I mean here is that a single datetime value has aspects that aren't always obvious from the datetime value itself. Examples include leap year information and weekday.

Let's assume you want to start an automatically expanding and shrinking MySQL replication cluster with up-to seven database servers. This blog shows how to setup up and start MaxScale to work with a master and a single slave and, when needed, how it adapts to the changing cluster configurations. While the set up here is simple similar behavior can be applied in bigger and more complex scenarios.

Configuration

Pages

Newsletter Signup

Subscribe to get MariaDB tips, tricks and news updates in your inbox: