Creating a Data Source with MariaDB Connector/ODBC

MariaDB Connector/ODBC is a database driver that uses the industry standard Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) API. Some of the key features of the driver are:

  • It is LGPL-licensed.
  • It is compliant with the ODBC 3.5 standard.
  • It can be used as a drop-in replacement for MySQL Connector/ODBC.
  • It supports both Unicode and ANSI modes.
  • It primarily uses the MariaDB/MySQL binary protocol (i.e. server-side prepared statements).

The current release series are:

  • MariaDB Connector/ODBC 3.1 is the current development release series.
  • MariaDB Connector/ODBC 3.0 is the current stable release series.
  • MariaDB Connector/ODBC 2.0 is the previous stable release series, which is currently still supported.

This page discusses how to create a data source with MariaDB Connector/ODBC.

Creating a Data Source with MariaDB Connector/ODBC on Windows

To create a data source on Windows, you would use the ODBC Data Source Administrator.

If you are using the 64-bit version of MariaDB Connector/ODBC, then make sure you use the 64-bit version of ODBC Data Source Administrator. Similarly, if you are using the 32-bit version of MariaDB Connector/ODBC, then make sure you use the 32-bit version of ODBC Data Source Administrator.

To open the ODBC Data Source Administrator in Windows 10:

  • On the Start page, type ODBC Data Sources. The ODBC Data Sources Desktop App should appear as a choice.

To open the ODBC Data Source Administrator in Windows 7:

  • On the Start menu, click Control Panel.
  • In Control Panel, click Administrative Tools.
  • In Administrative Tools, click Data Sources (ODBC).

To open the ODBC Data Source Administrator in Windows Server 2008:

  • On the Start menu, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Data Sources (ODBC).

Creating a Data Source with MariaDB Connector/ODBC on Linux

Linux uses UnixODBC as a Driver Manager. To create a data source on Linux, there are two steps:

  • First, configure UnixODBC to recognize MariaDB Connector/ODBC as a Driver.
  • Second, configure UnixODBC with a Data Source Name (DSN) for your MariaDB Server.

You will need to ensure that UnixODBC has been installed before you can perform these steps.

Configuring MariaDB Connector/ODBC as a UnixODBC Driver on Linux

The first step is to configure UnixODBC to recognize MariaDB Connector/ODBC as a Driver. To configure the Driver, you can use the odbcinst tool, which can add a configuration entry for MariaDB Connector/ODBC to the system's global /etc/odbcinst.ini file.

For example, create a template file similar to the following, with a name like MariaDB_odbc_driver_template.ini:

[MariaDB ODBC 3.0 Driver]
Description = MariaDB Connector/ODBC v.3.0
Driver = /usr/lib64/libmaodbc.so

And then install it to the system's global /etc/odbcinst.ini file with the following command:

sudo odbcinst -i -d -f MariaDB_odbc_driver_template.ini

At this point, you should be able to connect to MariaDB by using the Driver with the SQLDriverConnect function. To connect with SQLDriverConnect, you would need to specify Driver={MariaDB ODBC 3.0 Driver} in your connection string along with your other connection parameters.

See Parameters for connection string options.

Configuring a DSN with UnixODBC on Linux

The second step is to configure UnixODBC with a Data Source Name (DSN) for your MariaDB Server. A DSN allows you to centrally configure all of your server's connection parameters, so that you can easily configure how to connect to your server in your environment. To configure the DSN, you can use the odbcinst tool, which can add a configuration entry for the given data source to the system's global /etc/odbc.ini file or your user's local ~/.odbc.ini file.

For example, create a template file similar to the following, with a name like MariaDB_odbc_data_source_template.ini:

[MariaDB-server]
Description=MariaDB server
Driver=MariaDB ODBC 3.0 Driver
SERVER=<your server>
USER=<your user>
PASSWORD=<your password>
DATABASE=<your database>
PORT=<your port>

And then you can install it to the system's global /etc/odbc.ini file with the following command:

sudo odbcinst -i -s -l -f MariaDB_odbc_data_source_template.ini

Or you can install it to your user's local ~/.odbc.ini file with the following command:

odbcinst -i -s -h -f MariaDB_odbc_data_source_template.ini

At this point, you should be able to connect to MariaDB by using the DSN with either SQLConnect or the SQLDriverConnect functions. To connect with SQLConnect, you would have to provide MariaDB-server as the ServerName parameter. To connect with SQLDriverConnect, you would have to provide DSN={MariaDB-server} in the connection string along with your other connection parameters.

See Parameters for connection string options.

UnixODBC also provides a GUI to add DSNs. However, MariaDB Connector/ODBC doesn't yet support this GUI interface for adding DSNs.

Verifying a DSN Configuration with UnixODBC on Linux

You can verify that a DSN is properly configured with UnixODBC on Linux by using the isql utility.

For example, if the DSN is called MariaDB-server, then we can verify that it works properly by executing the following:

$ isql MariaDB-server
+---------------------------------------+
| Connected!                            |
|                                       |
| sql-statement                         |
| help [tablename]                      |
| quit                                  |
|                                       |
+---------------------------------------+
SQL> SELECT @@global.hostname;
+-------------------------------------------+
| @@global.hostname                         |
+-------------------------------------------+
| ip-172-30-0-249.us-west-2.compute.internal|
+-------------------------------------------+
SQLRowCount returns 1
1 rows fetched
SQL> quit

Changing UnixODBC's Configuration File Paths

You can also change the paths that unixODBC uses for its configuration files by changing some environment variables. For example:

  • ODBCSYSINI - Overloads path to unixODBC configuration files. By default equals to /etc.
  • ODBCINSTINI - Overloads the name of the drivers configuration file. It is relative to ODBCSYSINI and by default set to odbcinst.ini.
  • ODBCINI - Overloads the path to user configuration file. By default it is set to ~/.odbc.ini.

Creating a Data Source with MariaDB Connector/ODBC on Mac OS X

Mac OS X uses iODBC as a Driver Manager. To create a data source on Mac OS X, there are two primary ways to do it:

Creating a Data Source with iODBC Administrator on Mac OS X

iODBC Administrator is not installed by default. In order to use it, you need to dowload it from iODBC's download page and then install it.

Creating a Data Source with iODBC on Mac OS X

The steps to create a data source with iODBC on Mac OS X can be found here. There are essentially two steps:

  • First, configure iODBC to recognize MariaDB Connector/ODBC as a Driver.
  • Second, configure iODBC with a Data Source Name (DSN) for your MariaDB Server.

Configuring MariaDB Connector/ODBC as a iODBC Driver on Mac OS X

The first step is to configure iODBC to recognize MariaDB Connector/ODBC as a Driver.

The iODBC Driver configuration file might be at one of these paths:

  • The path specified by the $ODBCINSTINI environment variable.
  • ~/.odbcinst.ini
  • ~/Library/ODBC/odbcinst.ini
  • /etc/odbcinst.ini
  • /Library/ODBC/odbcinst.ini

MariaDB Connector/ODBC's PKG package automatically configures itself as a Driver in /Library/ODBC/odbcinst.ini, so you can most likely skip this step.

To add MariaDB Connector/ODBC as a Driver, the configuration file would look something like the following:

[ODBC Drivers]
MariaDB ODBC 3.1 Driver = installed

[MariaDB ODBC 3.1 Driver]
Description=MariaDB Connector/ODBC v.3.1
Driver=/Library/MariaDB/MariaDB-Connector-ODBC/libmaodbc.dylib
Threading=0

Configuring a DSN with iODBC on Mac OS X

The second step is to configure iODBC with a Data Source Name (DSN) for your MariaDB Server. A DSN allows you to centrally configure all of your server's connection parameters, so that you can easily configure how to connect to your server in your environment.

The iODBC DSN configuration file might be at one of these paths:

  • The path specified by the $ODBCINI environment variable.
  • ~/.odbc.ini
  • ~/Library/ODBC/odbc.ini
  • /etc/odbc.ini
  • /Library/ODBC/odbc.ini

To add a DSN that uses MariaDB Connector/ODBC, the configuration file would look something like the following:

[ODBC]
Debug = 1
DebugFile = /tmp/odbc-debugfile.log
Trace = 0
TraceFile = /tmp/odbc-tracefile.log
TraceAutoStop = 1

[ODBC Data Sources]
MariaDB-server = MariaDB ODBC 3.1 Driver

[MariaDB-server]
Description = MariaDB server
Driver = /Library/MariaDB/MariaDB-Connector-ODBC/libmaodbc.dylib
SERVER=<your server>
USER=<your user>
PASSWORD=<your password>
DATABASE=<your database>
PORT=<your port>

Verifying a DSN Configuration with iODBC on Mac OS X

You can verify that a DSN is properly configured with iODBC on Mac OS X by using the iodbctest utility.

For example, if the DSN is called MariaDB-server, then we can verify that it works properly by executing the following:

$ iodbctest "DSN=MariaDB-server"

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