FROM_UNIXTIME

Syntax

FROM_UNIXTIME(unix_timestamp), FROM_UNIXTIME(unix_timestamp,format)

Description

Returns a representation of the unix_timestamp argument as a value in 'YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS' or YYYYMMDDHHMMSS.uuuuuu format, depending on whether the function is used in a string or numeric context. The value is expressed in the current time zone. unix_timestamp is an internal timestamp value such as is produced by the UNIX_TIMESTAMP() function.

If format is given, the result is formatted according to the format string, which is used the same way as listed in the entry for the DATE_FORMAT() function.

Timestamps in MariaDB have a maximum value of 2147483647, equivalent to 2038-01-19 05:14:07. This is due to the underlying 32-bit limitation. Using the function on a timestamp beyond this will result in NULL being returned. Use DATETIME as a storage type if you require dates beyond this.

The options that can be used by FROM_UNIXTIME(), as well as DATE_FORMAT() and STR_TO_DATE(), are:

OptionDescription
%aShort weekday name in current locale (Variable lc_time_names).
%bShort form month name in current locale. For locale en_US this is one of: Jan,Feb,Mar,Apr,May,Jun,Jul,Aug,Sep,Oct,Nov or Dec.
%cMonth with 1 or 2 digits.
%DDay with English suffix 'th', 'nd', 'st' or 'rd''. (1st, 2nd, 3rd...).
%dDay with 2 digits.
%eDay with 1 or 2 digits.
%fSub seconds 6 digits.
%HHour with 2 digits between 00-23.
%hHour with 2 digits between 01-12.
%IHour with 2 digits between 01-12.
%iMinute with 2 digits.
%jDay of the year (001-366)
%kHour with 1 digits between 0-23.
%lHour with 1 digits between 1-12.
%MFull month name in current locale (Variable lc_time_names).
%mMonth with 2 digits.
%pAM/PM according to current locale (Variable lc_time_names).
%rTime in 12 hour format, followed by AM/PM. Short for '%I:%i:%S %p'.
%SSeconds with 2 digits.
%sSeconds with 2 digits.
%TTime in 24 hour format. Short for '%H:%i:%S'.
%UWeek number (00-53), when first day of the week is Sunday.
%uWeek number (00-53), when first day of the week is Monday.
%VWeek number (01-53), when first day of the week is Sunday. Used with %X.
%vWeek number (01-53), when first day of the week is Monday. Used with %x.
%WFull weekday name in current locale (Variable lc_time_names).
%wDay of the week. 0 = Sunday, 1 = Saturday.
%XYear with 4 digits when first day of the week is Sunday. Used with %V.
%xYear with 4 digits when first day of the week is Sunday. Used with %v.
%YYear with 4 digits.
%yYear with 2 digits.
%#For str_to_date(), skip all numbers.
%.For str_to_date(), skip all punctation characters.
%@For str_to_date(), skip all alpha characters.
%%A literal % character.

Performance Considerations

If your session time zone is set to SYSTEM (the default), FROM_UNIXTIME() will call the OS function to convert the data using the system time zone. At least on Linux, the corresponding function (localtime_r) uses a global mutex inside glibc that can cause contention under high concurrent load.

Set your time zone to a named time zone to avoid this issue. See mysql time zone tables for details on how to do this.

Examples

SELECT FROM_UNIXTIME(1196440219);
+---------------------------+
| FROM_UNIXTIME(1196440219) |
+---------------------------+
| 2007-11-30 11:30:19       |
+---------------------------+

SELECT FROM_UNIXTIME(1196440219) + 0;
+-------------------------------+
| FROM_UNIXTIME(1196440219) + 0 |
+-------------------------------+
|         20071130113019.000000 |
+-------------------------------+

SELECT FROM_UNIXTIME(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(), '%Y %D %M %h:%i:%s %x');
+---------------------------------------------------------+
| FROM_UNIXTIME(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(), '%Y %D %M %h:%i:%s %x') |
+---------------------------------------------------------+
| 2010 27th March 01:03:47 2010                           |
+---------------------------------------------------------+

See Also

Comments

Comments loading...
Content reproduced on this site is the property of its respective owners, and this content is not reviewed in advance by MariaDB. The views, information and opinions expressed by this content do not necessarily represent those of MariaDB or any other party.