MariaDB has always had the wait_timeout and interactive_timeout settings, which close connections after a certain period of inactivity.

However, these are by default set to a long wait period. In situations where transactions may be started, but not committed or rolled back, more granular control and a shorter timeout may be desirable so as to avoid locks being held for too long.

MariaDB 10.3 introduced three new variables to handle this situation.

These accept a time in seconds to time out, by closing the connection, transactions that are idle for longer than this period. By default all are set to zero, or no timeout.

idle_transaction_timeout affects all transactions, idle_write_transaction_timeout affects write transactions only and idle_readonly_transaction_timeout affects read transactions only. The latter two variables work independently. However, if either is set along with idle_transaction_timeout, the settings for idle_write_transaction_timeout or idle_readonly_transaction_timeout will take precedence.

Examples

SET SESSION idle_transaction_timeout=2;
BEGIN;
SELECT * FROM t;
Empty set (0.000 sec)
## wait 3 seconds
SELECT * FROM t;
ERROR 2006 (HY000): MySQL server has gone away
SET SESSION idle_write_transaction_timeout=2;
BEGIN;
SELECT * FROM t;
Empty set (0.000 sec)
## wait 3 seconds
SELECT * FROM t;
Empty set (0.000 sec)
INSERT INTO t VALUES(1);
## wait 3 seconds
SELECT * FROM t;
ERROR 2006 (HY000): MySQL server has gone away
SET SESSION idle_transaction_timeout=2, SESSION idle_readonly_transaction_timeout=10;
BEGIN;
SELECT * FROM t;
Empty set (0.000 sec)
 ## wait 3 seconds
SELECT * FROM t;
Empty set (0.000 sec)
## wait 11 seconds
SELECT * FROM t;
ERROR 2006 (HY000): MySQL server has gone away

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