May 24, 2018

MariaDB TX 3.0 – First to Deliver on the Promise of Enterprise Open Source

It’s one thing to be open source. It’s another to be enterprise open source.

That begs the question: What does it mean to be enterprise open source?

You have to be 100% committed to the open source community – collaboration, transparency and innovation. You have to be 100% committed to customer success – providing the enterprise features and reliability needed to support mission-critical applications.

However, being committed is not enough. You have to be a leader. You have to challenge proprietary vendors, and that includes vendors who limit open source projects with proprietary extensions and/or plugins.

MariaDB TX 3.0 sets the standard for enterprise open source databases, and as the leader, we’re challenging Oracle, Microsoft and IBM with it. Here’s how.

Oracle Database compatibility

MariaDB TX 3.0 is the first enterprise open source database with Oracle Database compatibility, including support for stored procedures written in PL/SQL. Until now, if you needed Oracle Database compatibility, you needed a proprietary database (IBM DB2 or EnterpriseDB). Until now, if you needed Oracle Database compatibility, you needed a proprietary database (IBM DB2 or EnterpriseDB). Today, you can run those Oracle PL/SQL stored procedures on MariaDB TX!

Temporal features

MariaDB TX 3.0 is the first enterprise open source database with temporal features, including built-in system-versioned tables and standard temporal query syntax. Until now, if you needed the functional equivalent of Oracle Flashback queries or Microsoft SQL Server temporal tables, you needed a proprietary database. Today, you can run those temporal queries on MariaDB TX.

Faster schema changes

MariaDB TX 3.0 is the first enterprise open source database to support invisible columns (like Oracle Database), compressed columns and the ability to add columns (with or without default values) to a table without causing all of the rows to be updated (i.e., a table rebuild) – something you can’t do in MySQL or Postgres. Simply said, life is easier with MariaDB TX.

Purpose-built storage

MariaDB TX 3.0 is the first enterprise open source database to support a variety of workloads, all with the same level of performance, by leveraging multiple, purpose-built storage engines: the default storage engine for mixed or read-mostly workloads (InnoDB), an SSD-optimized storage engine for write-intensive workloads (MyRocks) and a distributed storage engine for workloads requiring extreme scalability and/or concurrency (Spider).

While general-purpose databases are limited to supporting one workload really well, MariaDB TX can support a variety of workloads very well – and at the same time. Would you need a NoSQL database if your relational database supported JSON and distributed storage (i.e., scale out)?

You could deploy multiple specialized databases, but wouldn’t you rather standardize on a single database? Well, you can with MariaDB TX.

Data protection

MariaDB TX 3.0 is the first enterprise open source database to support anonymization via complete data obfuscation and psuedoanonymization via full or partial data masking, necessary features assuming you want to comply with EU GDPR and don’t want your company featured in tomorrow's headlines as the featured security breach of the month. If you’re using Oracle Database, these features are part of Oracle Data Redaction, and require Oracle Advanced Security – an extra $7,500 per core. MariaDB TX database administrators sleep well at night.

Conclusion

We created MariaDB TX 3.0 so you can migrate from Oracle/Microsoft/IBM to the enterprise open source database you want without sacrificing the enterprise features you need. Ready?

About Shane Johnson

Shane Johnson is the Senior Director of Product Marketing at MariaDB. Prior to MariaDB, he led product and technical marketing at Couchbase. In the past, he performed technical roles in development, architecture and evangelism at Red Hat and other companies. His background is in Java and distributed systems.

Read all posts by Shane Johnson