MariaDB Blog

June 04, 2018

Using MariaDB Backup and MariaDB MaxScale to Scale Online

MariaDB backup is the online backup tool that is part of MariaDB TX, it is an online backup tool that supports many advanced features. MariaDB MaxScale is a database proxy that, among other things allows read/write split scalability, online configuration and much more and which is also included with MariaDB TX. By combining these tools, this blog shows how a replication cluster can be scaled online without downtime.

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May 29, 2018

Simplify User Account Management with MariaDB MaxScale 2.2 and MariaDB Server 10.3

Configuring database user accounts for MariaDB MaxScale and a backend cluster has typically required a duplicate effort. This is because an account entry must exist for both the real client host and the MaxScale host. MaxScale authenticates incoming users against the user entry with the real client host. When MaxScale creates the routing session, it uses the client’s username and password scramble to authenticate the client to the backend. The backend sees the connection coming from the machine running MaxScale.

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May 25, 2018

What's New in MariaDB Server 10.3

We are happy to announce the general availability (GA) of MariaDB Server 10.3! This release is a big milestone for the development of MariaDB Server and is the result of a huge effort by the development team and contributors – thanks to everyone involved! With our previous major release of MariaDB Server 10.2 last year, we started a journey of adding more enterprise-grade features to better close the gap with proprietary databases.

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May 25, 2018

Automatic Data Versioning in MariaDB Server 10.3

MariaDB Server 10.3 comes with a new, very useful feature that will ease the design of many applications. Data versioning is important for several perspectives. Compliance might require that you need to store data changes. For analytical queries, you may want to look at data at a specific point in time and for auditing purposes, what changes were made and when is important. Also, in the case of a table being deleted it can be of great value to recover it from history.

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May 25, 2018

Sequences Support in MariaDB Server 10.3

In the SQL standard SQL:2003 sequences are defined. The idea of sequences is to have a way of requesting unique values on demand. The typical use case for sequences is to have a unique identifier that can be used on multiple tables. In addition it might be useful in some cases to have an identifier before an actual row is inserted. With the normal way of having an automatically incrementing identifier, the identifier value will only be available after insert of the row and the identifier will only be unique inside its own table.

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May 24, 2018

MariaDB TX 3.0 – First to Deliver on the Promise of Enterprise Open Source

It’s one thing to be open source. It’s another to be enterprise open source.

That begs the question: What does it mean to be enterprise open source?

You have to be 100% committed to the open source community – collaboration, transparency and innovation. You have to be 100% committed to customer success – providing the enterprise features and reliability needed to support mission-critical applications.

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May 24, 2018

The Ease of Migrating to MariaDB TX Using New Oracle Compatibility Features

One of the central themes of MariaDB TX 3.0 is reducing the cost, reusing established skill sets and increasing the efficiency, speed and technical viability of migrations from complex, proprietary databases. We’ve added some amazing new features including SEQUENCE constructs, Oracle-style packages, and the ROW data type - making migrations dramatically easier and a true game changer for enterprise open source databases.

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May 23, 2018

A Look into MariaDB Auditing for GDPR Compliance

When we are talking about a database auditing concept, what we are focused on is tracking the use of database records, and the monitoring of each operation on the data.

The auditing activities goal is to provide a clear and reliable answer to the typical 4 W questions: Who accessed the database, When did this happen, What was touched, Where this access came from. Auditing should also help the security team answer the 5th W: Why this happened?

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